Frame description

A Wearer wears Accessories, which are made of some Material. The Body_part and/or  the Clothing on which the Accessory is worn or attached might be mentioned. Most of the Accessories are non-essential (clothing) items.

Examples:

1. Karla hat zwei goldene Armreifen.1. Karla has two golden bracelets.
2. Er trägt eine runde Brille und lächelt.2. He wears round glasses and smiles.
3. Über seinem Hemd trägt er breite Hosenträger aus Leder. 3. Over his shirt he wears wide suspenders made from leather.

Display columns:

Details
Examples
Grammar Notes
Sentence Templates
Alternate Forms

Frame Elements

Frame Element descriptions (on hover):

This frame element is the Accessory.

The FE Body_part identifies the place on the body where a particular Accessory is located.

The Clothing is the item of clothing that the Wearer is wearing.

This FE identifies the Material from which the Accessory is made.

The Wearer wears the Accessory.

Details
Examples
Grammar Notes
Sentence Templates
Alternate Forms
See All Information
Accessoire, das noun accessory

Details:

accessory

German "das Accessoire" in this frame is an umbrella term for items that are add-ons the outfit of a Wearer which are not (strictly) necessary, and not necessarily clothing items, e.g. bags, glasses, belts, scarfs, jewelry, etc. The originally French word came into the German language in the 19th century, and it is pronounced like the French noun ['akse swar']. It is used like its English counterpart.

            


Further details:

Wordformation:

German speakers sometimes use compound nouns to specify the type of accessory, note that the components of the compound noun are not fused into one word but instead are connected by one or more dashes: "das Leder-Accessoire" ("leather accessory"), "das Must-have-Accessoire" ("must-have accessory"), "das Vorzeige-Accessoire" ("demonstrative accessory"), "das Lifestyle-Accessoire" ("lifestyle accessory"), "das Alltags-Accessory" ("every-day accessory"), etc.

Because of its meaning as add-on, the word "Accessoiry" ("accessory") also appears in other frames, in German as well as in English, depending on the context. For instance, we can talk about home accessories in the sense of decorations like candles or pillows or car accessories like a phone holder.

More information in DWDS, the digital dictionary of the German language:

„Accessoire“, bereitgestellt durch das Digitale Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache, <https://www.dwds.de/wb/Accessoire>, abgerufen am 04.11.2021.

Example Sentences:

  1. Viele der Besucher tragen Accessoires.
  2. Einige tragen noch die Accessoires vergangener Zeiten: Goldkettchen und verspiegelte Sonnenbrillen.
  3. Vor Weihnachten kaufen viele Männer ihren Frauen Designer-Accessoires.
  4. Andererseits ist die Handtasche für die Frau auch ein schmückendes Accessoire.
  5. Angeboten werden Kleider, Accessoires, Haushaltswaren, Designstücke, Sportgeräte, Technik und witzige Kuriositäten von Frauen für Frauen.
  6. Dieser Pullover lässt sich super mit diesem Rock kombinieren, welche Accessoires passen dazu?
  7. Wer will, kann den Look mit Accessoires wie einer Gasmaske, einer Schutzbrille oder einem Schild vervollständigen.
  8. Denn damals beginnt das Geschäft der Hundezüchter – und aus dem Tier wird ein teures Accessoire.
  1. Many of the visitors wear accessories.
  2. Some wear still the accessories of long ago: golden braclets and mirrowed sunglasses.
  3. Before Christmas many husbands buy their wifes designer accessories.
  4. On the other hand is the purse for the woman also a decorative accessory.
  5. Offered are dresses, accessories, home goods, designer pieces, sports equipment, technical appliances and funny curiosities from women for women.
  6. This sweater combines well with this skirt, which accessories match with them?
  7. Who wants, can complete the look with accessories like a gas mask, safety glasses or a shield.
  8. Because at that time begins the business of the dog breeders - and the animal turns into an expensive accessory.

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. WEARER trägt Accessoire.
  2. [modisch- / unverzichtbar- / trendig- / dekorativ- / witzig- / schick- / extravagant- / passend- / usw. Accessoire]
  1. WEARER wears accessory.
  2. [fashionable / indispensible / trendy / decorative / funny / chic / fancy / matching / etc. accessory]

Details:

accessory

German "das Accessoire" in this frame is an umbrella term for items that are add-ons the outfit of a Wearer which are not (strictly) necessary, and not necessarily clothing items, e.g. bags, glasses, belts, scarfs, jewelry, etc. The originally French word came into the German language in the 19th century, and it is pronounced like the French noun ['akse swar']. It is used like its English counterpart.

            


Further details:

Wordformation:

German speakers sometimes use compound nouns to specify the type of accessory, note that the components of the compound noun are not fused into one word but instead are connected by one or more dashes: "das Leder-Accessoire" ("leather accessory"), "das Must-have-Accessoire" ("must-have accessory"), "das Vorzeige-Accessoire" ("demonstrative accessory"), "das Lifestyle-Accessoire" ("lifestyle accessory"), "das Alltags-Accessory" ("every-day accessory"), etc.

Because of its meaning as add-on, the word "Accessoiry" ("accessory") also appears in other frames, in German as well as in English, depending on the context. For instance, we can talk about home accessories in the sense of decorations like candles or pillows or car accessories like a phone holder.

More information in DWDS, the digital dictionary of the German language:

„Accessoire“, bereitgestellt durch das Digitale Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache, <https://www.dwds.de/wb/Accessoire>, abgerufen am 04.11.2021.

Alternate Forms:

(pl.) die Accessoires
Armband, das noun bracelet

Details:

bracelet

German "das Armband" is like its English equivalent "bracelet" an ornamental band, hoop, or chain worn on the wrist or arm. It is a synonym to "der Armreifen" but it is more frequently used. There are no significant differences to its English counterpart.