Frame description

The words and phrases in this frame describe a conflict between two Sides (Side_1 and Side_2) who disagree on some Issue. The conflict results in a verbal argument. The difference between Arguing and Fighting is that Arguing involves a verbal conflict (which may or may not escalate to violence), while Fighting definitely includes some sort of physical altercation.

Note that it is common for LUs in the Fighting frame to be used figuratively to describe Arguing, even when they don't have a specific sense that falls within the Arguing frame. This is because violent conflicts are related conceptually to other kinds of conflicts, and can easily serve to construe non-violent conflicts as more intense or fierce.

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Examples
Grammar Notes
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Alternate Forms

Frame Elements

Frame Element descriptions (on hover):

Someone who is arguing (typically realized as the grammatical subject).

The other person involved in the argument, who is against Side_1.

The two opposing parties involved in the argument.

An unresolved question over which the two sides are in disagreement and about which they are arguing.

Details
Examples
Grammar Notes
Sentence Templates
Alternate Forms
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aneinandergeraten verb to quarrel, to fight (verbally)

Details:

to quarrel with one another, to fight, to tangle with 

This verb literally means "to come together." However, in this case the situation is a negative one. The verb is used to describe Sides having angry disputes about an Issue. As a result, physical conflict may occur, although it is not necessarily implied with the use of this verb.

When conjugated, this verb behaves like a separable prefix verb, similar to "kennenlernen" ("to meet") in the Personal Relationship frame.

Example Sentences:

  1. Die Ehefrau und die Liebhaberin geraten aneinander.
  2. Die Beiden gerieten aneinander.
  3. Die Länder sind über Grenzstreitigkeiten wiederholt aneinandergeraten. 
  4. Der Schauspieler  geriet in New York mit Fotografen  aneinander. 
  5. Die beiden Schüler waren im Unterricht aneinandergeraten
  1. The wife and the mistress  are fighting.
  2. The two  fought.
  3. The countries  fought  over border disputes repeatedly.
  4. The actor fought in New York with photographers.
  5. The two students had in class fought.

Grammar:

Verbs with Separable Prefixes

Some verbs have a prefix that moves around in the sentence, depending on what form the verb takes. In the infinitive form, the prefix is attached, like "ausgehen" (to go out). If the verb is conjugated (in present or simple past tense), the prefix appears at the end of the clause, as in "Ich gehe heute Abend aus." For more information about these verbs, see the examples for individual verbs or read these explanations from Grimm Grammar: present tense, conversational past tense (Perfekt).

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. SIDES geraten aneinander.
  2. SIDES geraten aneinander wegen ISSUE.
  3. SIDE_1 gerät mit SIDE_2 aneinander.
  4. SIDES geraten über ISSUE aneinander.
  1. SIDES fight.
  2. SIDES fight because of ISSUE.
  3. SIDE_1 fights with SIDE_2.
  4. SIDES fight about ISSUE.

Details:

to quarrel with one another, to fight, to tangle with 

This verb literally means "to come together." However, in this case the situation is a negative one. The verb is used to describe Sides having angry disputes about an Issue. As a result, physical conflict may occur, although it is not necessarily implied with the use of this verb.

When conjugated, this verb behaves like a separable prefix verb, similar to "kennenlernen" ("to meet") in the Personal Relationship frame.

Alternate Forms:

(wir) geraten aneinander, sind aneinandergeraten, gerieten aneinander
angreifen verb to attack

Details:

to attack

As in English, this verb can be used to describe an act of agression in a heated verbal argument between Sides over an Issue, although it can also evoke the Fighting frame (which would imply a violent altercation).

Example Sentences:

  1. Er greift die Kritiker mit den Worten an
  2. Das Publikum griff den Redner heftig an.
  3. In der Zeitung hat man  den Politiker scharf angegriffen.
  1. He  attacks the critics with words.
  2. The public attacked the speaker fiercely.
  3. In the newspaper, one attacked the politician sharply.

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. SIDE_1 greift SIDE_2 an.
  2. SIDE_1 greift SIDE_2 wegen ISSUE an.
  1. SIDE_1 attacks SIDE_2.
  2. SIDE_1 attacks SIDE_2 because of ISSUE.

Details:

to attack

As in English, this verb can be used to describe an act of agression in a heated verbal argument between Sides over an Issue, although it can also evoke the Fighting frame (which would imply a violent altercation).

Alternate Forms:

(er) greift an, griff an, hat angegriffen
argumentieren verb to argue

Details:

to argue

This verb is used to describe a situation where Sides verbally disagree with one another. Their arguments involve a series of reasons for and against an Issue. In contrast to the verb 'streiten,' the possibility of Sides having physical contact is practically nonexistent.

It is possible for a Side to argue "für" ("for") an Issue, however, it is much more common to say that a Side is arguing "gegen" ("against") an Issue. See the sentence templates for other possible combinations.

Example Sentences:

  1. Sie argumentieren nicht über Geschichte.
  2. Sie argumenterien sachlich und logisch.
  3. Wir wollen argumentieren und nicht demonstrieren.
  4. Der Finanzminister argumentiert, dass die Kosten 328 Millionen Euro betragen.
  5. Politiker argumentieren für eine Verkürzung der Schulzeit.
  6. Sie argumentierte gegen die konservativen Ideologen. 
  7. Er argumentiert gegen die Evolutionstheorie. 
  8. Die Gegenseite argumentierte dagegen.
  9. Ich hatte völlig falsch argumentiert.
  1. They are not arguing about history.
  2. They argue objectively and logically.
  3. We want to argue and not demonstrate. 
  4. The Finance Minister  argues that the costs total 328 million euros.
  5. Polliticians  argue for a shortening of school days.
  6. She  argued against the conservative ideologies.
  7. He  argues against evolutionary theory.
  8. The opposing side  argued against it. 
  9. I had completely falsely argued.

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. SIDE_1 argumentiert gegen SIDE_2.
  2. SIDE_1 argumentiert mit SIDE_2 über ISSUE.
  3. SIDE_1 argumentiert gegen ISSUE.
  4. SIDE_1 argumentiert für ISSUE.
  5. SIDE_1 argumentiert, dass...
  1. SIDE_1 argues against SIDE_2.
  2. SIDE_1 argues with SIDE_2 about ISSUE.
  3. SIDE_1 argues against ISSUE.
  4. SIDE_1 argues for ISSUE.
  5. SIDE_1 argues that...

Details:

to argue

This verb is used to describe a situation where Sides verbally disagree with one another. Their arguments involve a series of reasons for and against an Issue. In contrast to the verb 'streiten,' the possibility of Sides having physical contact is practically nonexistent.

It is possible for a Side to argue "für" ("for") an Issue, however, it is much more common to say that a Side is arguing "gegen" ("against") an Issue. See the sentence templates for other possible combinations.

Alternate Forms:

(er) argumentiert, hat argumentiert, argumentierte
das Gezänk noun bickering, quarrel

Details:

bickering, quarrel, argument

This noun is used similarly to its English counterpart 'bickering'. As a result of constant 'Gezänk,' bystanders often tend to be annoyed. The noun has an even more negative connotation to it compared to the noun 'Streit'.

Example Sentences:

  1. Es gab Gezänk zwischen Gil und der unerschütterlichen Inez.
  2. Das Gezänk hört man bis auf die Terrasse.
  3. Die ersten Gespräche der Generalstäbe endeten im Gezänk.
  1. There was bickering between Gil and the unshakable Inez.
  2. The bickering can be heard all the way on the terrace.
  3. The first discussions of the generals ended in bickering.

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. [Gezänk um ISSUE]
  2. [Gezänk zwischen SIDES]
  1. [bickering about ISSUE]
  2. [bickering between SIDES]

Details:

bickering, quarrel, argument

This noun is used similarly to its English counterpart 'bickering'. As a result of constant 'Gezänk,' bystanders often tend to be annoyed. The noun has an even more negative connotation to it compared to the noun 'Streit'.

Alternate Forms:

(pl.) die Gezänke
der Streit noun argument, dispute, fight

Details:

argument, dispute, verbal fight

This noun is used to describe a situation where Sides have a debate or argument because of differences in opinions. Usually, this kind of argument does not involve physical contact, however, occasionally Sides might end up hurting each other. The plural form is rarely used.

Example Sentences:

  1. Es gibt Streit über den Preis. 
  2. Der Streit mit den Eltern wurde immer heftiger. 
  3. Der Streit zwischen Bewohnern und Eigentümer eskaliert. 
  4. Es gab Streit um die Raketenabwehr.
  5. Der Streit dauerte nicht lange.
  6. Grund für die Tat war ein Streit unter Betrunkenen. 
  7. Im Streit mit der Schwesterpartei CDU um die richtige Flüchtlingspolitik ist die CSU offenbar um weitere Entspannung bemüht.
  8. Michelangelo ließ sich in einem Streit seine Nase zertrümmern.
  1. There is a dispute about the prize.
  2. The fight with the parents became ever fiercer.
  3. The fight between occupants and owners escalated.
  4. There was a dispute about the rocket defense.
  5. The argument didn't last long.
  6. The reason for the crime was a fight among drunks.
  7. In the dispute with the sister party CDU over the right refugee-politics, the CSU is openly troubled about further relaxation.
  8. Michelangelo got his nose smashed in an argument.

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. SIDES haben Streit.
  2. SIDE_1 hat Streit mit SIDE_2.
  3. SIDE_1 hat Streit mit SIDE_2 um ISSUE.
  4. [Streit um ISSUE]
  5. [Streit zwischen SIDES]
  6. [Streit unter SIDES]
  1. SIDES are having an argument.
  2. SIDE_1 is having an argument with SIDE_2.
  3. SIDE_1  is having an argument with  SIDE_2 about ISSUE.
  4. [argument about ISSUE]
  5. [argument between SIDES]
  6. [argument among SIDES]

Details:

argument, dispute, verbal fight

This noun is used to describe a situation where Sides have a debate or argument because of differences in opinions. Usually, this kind of argument does not involve physical contact, however, occasionally Sides might end up hurting each other. The plural form is rarely used.

Alternate Forms:

(pl.) die Streite
sich zanken verb to bicker, to squabble

Details:

to bicker, to fight (verbally), to squabble

This verb is used in much the same way as the reflexive verb "sich streiten," in that it can be used with or without the (accusative) reflexive pronoun. Commonly, it is used to describe arguing with each other, so the reflexive pronoun is present to highlight that reciprocal relationship. "Zanken" may appear with a reflexive even more often than "streiten."

Unlike "streiten," the verb "zanken" is often used in situations when children argue, so it has the implication that the Issue is not very important.

Example Sentences:

  1. Die Kinder zanken  sich.
  2. Die Schwester  zankt sich mit ihrem Bruder.
  3. Republikaner und Demokraten in den USA zankten sich weiter über den Haushalt.
  4. Seit Monaten zanken sich das Innen- und Justizministerium  um das Gesetz.
  5. Ich habe keine Zeit mich mit dir zu zanken.
  1. The kids bickered.
  2. The sister bickers with her brother.
  3. Republicans and Democrats in the USA bickered further about the budget.
  4. For months, the Interior Ministry and Justice Ministry are bickering over the law.
  5. I don't have time to bicker with you.

Grammar:

Reflexive Verbs and Pronouns

Verbs that are used reflexively often carry a reciprocal meaning or the meaning that the subject is performing the action of the verb on themself, although some abstract verbs are used reflexively without such meanings. In any case, the reflexive pronouns and word order are the same. As a general rule, the reflexive pronoun should appear just after the subject, although the V2 rule trumps this one, so in a basic sentence, you will find: subject, verb, reflexive (e.g. Er verliebt sich in Melanie, "He is falling in love with Melanie"). For further examples, consult the Examples sections of reflexive verbs. Click here for further explanation.

NominativAkkusativDativ
ichmichmir
dudichdir
er/sie/essichsich
wirunsuns
ihreucheuch
sie/Siesichsich

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. SIDES zanken.
  2. SIDES zanken sich.
  3. SIDES zanken sich um ISSUE.
  4. SIDES zanken sich über ISSUE.
  5. SIDE_1 zankt sich mit SIDE_2.
  6. SIDE_1 zankt sich mit SIDE_2 um ISSUE.
  7. SIDE_1 zankt sich mit SIDE_2 über ISSUE.
  1. SIDES quarrel.
  2. SIDES quarrel (with each other).
  3. SIDES quarrel over ISSUE.
  4. SIDES quarrel about ISSUE.
  5. SIDE_1 quarrels with SIDE_2.
  6. SIDE_1 quarrels with SIDE_2 over ISSUE.
  7. SIDE_1 quarrels with SIDE_2 about ISSUE.

Details:

to bicker, to fight (verbally), to squabble

This verb is used in much the same way as the reflexive verb "sich streiten," in that it can be used with or without the (accusative) reflexive pronoun. Commonly, it is used to describe arguing with each other, so the reflexive pronoun is present to highlight that reciprocal relationship. "Zanken" may appear with a reflexive even more often than "streiten."

Unlike "streiten," the verb "zanken" is often used in situations when children argue, so it has the implication that the Issue is not very important.

Alternate Forms:

(er) zankt sich, hat sich gezankt, zankte sich
streiten verb to fight (verbally), to argue

Details:

to argue, to fight (verbally)

Because this verb is used when two or more Sides have fight (verbally) about an Issue, it is commonly used with a reflexive pronoun in accusative (as in "they fight each other"). 

Note that it is also possible to use this verb without the reflexive pronoun (the meaning is the same). Typically the Sides are either realized together (with or without the reflexive) or the reflexive pronoun is applied to Side_1, and Side_2 follows the preposition "mit" ("with"), as in "Ich streite mich mit meinem Mann" ("I fight with my husband"). This verb is not used to describe strictly physical fights (see "kämpfen" for that meaning), although it is not unheard of for a verbal fight to escalate to physical violence.

Example Sentences:

  1. Die Regierungschefs streiten noch.
  2. Meine Eltern streiten  sich.
  3. Annette und Hans streiten sich  über politische Fragen.
  4. Die Männerstritten sich um die hübsche Frau.
  5. Wir streiten uns um nichts.
  6. Musst du dich immerzu mit ihm streiten?
  7. Die betrunkene Frau hat sich mit ihrem neuen Freund gestritten.
  1. The heads of government are still fighting.
  2. My parents argue.
  3. Annette and Hans argue about political questions.
  4. The men  argued over the beautiful woman.
  5. We  fight about nothing.
  6. Must you always with him argue?
  7. The drunk woman fought with her new boyfriend.

Grammar:

Reflexive Verbs and Pronouns

Verbs that are used reflexively often carry a reciprocal meaning or the meaning that the subject is performing the action of the verb on themself, although some abstract verbs are used reflexively without such meanings. In any case, the reflexive pronouns and word order are the same. As a general rule, the reflexive pronoun should appear just after the subject, although the V2 rule trumps this one, so in a basic sentence, you will find: subject, verb, reflexive (e.g. Er verliebt sich in Melanie, "He is falling in love with Melanie"). For further examples, consult the Examples sections of reflexive verbs. Click here for further explanation.

NominativAkkusativDativ
ichmichmir
dudichdir
er/sie/essichsich
wirunsuns
ihreucheuch
sie/Siesichsich

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. SIDES streiten.
  2. SIDES streiten sich.
  3. SIDES streiten sich um ISSUE.
  4. SIDES streiten sich über ISSUE.
  5. SIDE_1 streitet sich mit SIDE_2.
  6. SIDE_1 streitet sich mit SIDE_2 um ISSUE.
  7. SIDE_1 streitet sich mit SIDE_2 über ISSUE.
  1. SIDES argue.
  2. SIDES argue (with each other).
  3. SIDES argue over ISSUE.
  4. SIDES argue about ISSUE.
  5. SIDE_1 argues with SIDE_2.
  6. SIDE_1 argues with SIDE_2 over ISSUE.
  7. SIDE_1 argues with SIDE_2 about ISSUE.

Details:

to argue, to fight (verbally)

Because this verb is used when two or more Sides have fight (verbally) about an Issue, it is commonly used with a reflexive pronoun in accusative (as in "they fight each other"). 

Note that it is also possible to use this verb without the reflexive pronoun (the meaning is the same). Typically the Sides are either realized together (with or without the reflexive) or the reflexive pronoun is applied to Side_1, and Side_2 follows the preposition "mit" ("with"), as in "Ich streite mich mit meinem Mann" ("I fight with my husband"). This verb is not used to describe strictly physical fights (see "kämpfen" for that meaning), although it is not unheard of for a verbal fight to escalate to physical violence.

Alternate Forms:

(er) streitet (sich), hat (sich) gestritten, stritt (sich)