Frame description

Cognizer holds a particular Opinion, which may be portrayed as being about a particular Topic.

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Frame Elements

Frame Element descriptions (on hover):

The person who has the Opinion.

The Cognizer's way of thinking, which is not always generally accepted. The Opinion is typically dependent on the Cognizer's point of view.

Details
Examples
Grammar Notes
Sentence Templates
Alternate Forms
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denken verb to think

Details:

to think

In the Opinion frame, "denken" ("to think") means to have an opinion or belief about some Topic. The Opinion is typically expressed by a dependent clause headed by "dass" ("that"). Click here to review word order after subordinating conjunctions.

Example Sentences:

  1. Die Männer denken, was sie wollen.
  2. Bärbel dachte, sie könnte wieder gesund werden.
  3. Wir dachtendass wir die Medien an unserer Seite brauchten, um erfolgreich zu sein.
  4. Dann guckt sie natürlich und denktdass etwas mit Toni nicht in Ordnung ist.
  1. The men think what they want.
  2. Bärbel thought she could again become healthy.
  3. We thought that we needed the media on our side, in order to be successful.
  4. Then she looks, naturally, and thinks that something with Toni is not in order.

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. COGNIZER denkt, OPINION.
  1. COGNIZER thinks, OPINION.

Details:

to think

In the Opinion frame, "denken" ("to think") means to have an opinion or belief about some Topic. The Opinion is typically expressed by a dependent clause headed by "dass" ("that"). Click here to review word order after subordinating conjunctions.

Alternate Forms:

(er) denkt, hat gedacht, dachte
der Gedanke noun thought, idea

Details:

thought, idea

This noun is used as in English, although not to indicate not thinking in general, but only individual thoughts (i.e. it cannot be used as a mass noun as in "western thought;" for this use see "das Denken" in the Pondering frame). The meaning difference between "Gedanke" in this frame and "Gedanke" in the Thinking: Pondering frame is that here, the usage typically involves something more akin to an idea. Obviously, all usages in this frame imply an opinion rather than a thought as a feature of mental activity. This example illustrates its use in Opinion: "Erzählen Sie uns von Ihren Gedanken an Heideggers Sein und Zeit" ("Tell us of your thoughts on Heidegger's Being and Time."

Example Sentences:

  1. Ich spreche als Koch vor allem über meine eigenen Wünsche und Gedanken.
  2. Auch Arendt hielt an dem Gedanken fest, dass Vernunft und Denken bessere Menschen machen könnten.
  3. Es ist zu bedauern, daß Clausius die Gedanken Carnots nur in der Überarbeitung von Clapeyron kennen gelernt hat.
  4. Erzählen Sie uns von Ihren Gedanken an Nationalismus.
  1. I speak as a cook first and foremost about my own wishes and thoughts.
  2. Also Arendt holds to the idea tightly that reason and thought could make better people.
  3. It is regrettable that Clausius became familiar with the thoughts of Carnot only in the reworking of Clapeyron.
  4. Tell us of your thoughts on nationalism.

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. [COGNIZERs Gedanken]
  2. [die Gedanken COGNIZER.genitive]
  3. [COGNIZERs Gedanken an OPINION]
  4. COGNIZER hat Gedanken.
  5. COGNIZER hat den Gedanken, dass OPINION.
  1. [COGNIZER's thoughts/ideas]
  2. [the thoughts of COGNIZER]
  3. [COGNIZER's ideas about OPINION]
  4. COGNIZER has thoughts.
  5. COGNIZER has the thought/idea that OPINION.

Details:

thought, idea

This noun is used as in English, although not to indicate not thinking in general, but only individual thoughts (i.e. it cannot be used as a mass noun as in "western thought;" for this use see "das Denken" in the Pondering frame). The meaning difference between "Gedanke" in this frame and "Gedanke" in the Thinking: Pondering frame is that here, the usage typically involves something more akin to an idea. Obviously, all usages in this frame imply an opinion rather than a thought as a feature of mental activity. This example illustrates its use in Opinion: "Erzählen Sie uns von Ihren Gedanken an Heideggers Sein und Zeit" ("Tell us of your thoughts on Heidegger's Being and Time."

Alternate Forms:

die Gedanken (pl.)
der Glaube noun belief

Details:

belief

Most instances of this LU fall within the Awareness frame, although as with the related LU "glauben" ("to believe"), some instances may evoke the Opinon or Certainty frames, as explained below. Note that although this noun does have a plural form, it is very rarely used.  

"Der Glaube" in the Awareness frame includes uses where the Cognizer has a particular belief in their mental model of the world. This differs from "der Glaube" in the Opinion frame in that the Cognizer holds the Topic or Content not as an Opinion, but as part of their subjective reality. Some ambiguity between these senses is possible. However, the preposition "an" ("in") is a clear sign that the Awareness frame is at play. Saying that a person believes "in" something implies that they hold that concept as part of their subjective reality. Thus the prepositional phrase with "an" ("in") is used to express the Content (the concept that the Cognizer believes in), as in example 7.

The Awareness sense of "der Glaube" can also overlap with the Certainty frame. The difference is that in the Certainty frame, there is a stronger emphasis on the implication that the Content (the belief) is correct or accurate, rather than a part of the Cognizer's subjective world view. 

Example Sentences:

  1. Aber sie ist mir Basis für einen kritischen Glauben.
  2. Ohne den Glauben daran, dass die Menschen bei aller Begrenztheit und bei allem Egoismus doch auch genügend Fähigkeit zu konstruktiver Zusammenarbeit haben, wird es uns schwer fallen, den notwendigen Impetus für die Zukunft aufzubringen.
  1. But it is to me grounds for a critical belief.
  2. Without the belief that people with all their limitations and all their egoism still also have sufficient ability for constructive cooperation, it will be difficult for us, to muster the necessary impetus for the future.

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. COGNIZER hat den Glauben, dass OPINION.
  1. COGNIZER has the belief that OPINION.

Details:

belief

Most instances of this LU fall within the Awareness frame, although as with the related LU "glauben" ("to believe"), some instances may evoke the Opinon or Certainty frames, as explained below. Note that although this noun does have a plural form, it is very rarely used.  

"Der Glaube" in the Awareness frame includes uses where the Cognizer has a particular belief in their mental model of the world. This differs from "der Glaube" in the Opinion frame in that the Cognizer holds the Topic or Content not as an Opinion, but as part of their subjective reality. Some ambiguity between these senses is possible. However, the preposition "an" ("in") is a clear sign that the Awareness frame is at play. Saying that a person believes "in" something implies that they hold that concept as part of their subjective reality. Thus the prepositional phrase with "an" ("in") is used to express the Content (the concept that the Cognizer believes in), as in example 7.

The Awareness sense of "der Glaube" can also overlap with the Certainty frame. The difference is that in the Certainty frame, there is a stronger emphasis on the implication that the Content (the belief) is correct or accurate, rather than a part of the Cognizer's subjective world view. 

Alternate Forms:

den Glauben (sing.akk), dem Glauben (sing.dat), des Glaubens (sing.gen), die Glauben (pl.)
die Meinung noun opinion

Details:

opinion

In most instances, this noun can be used like English "opinion," with the exception of the set phrase "meiner Meinung nach" ("in my opinion").  The possessive pronoun (in dative) in this phrase can be modified to reflect anyone's opinion, but the "nach" must always appear after "Meinung." The whole phrase fills the first position in the sentence (if it comes first), so a conjugated verb often follows it. See examples 

Another common collocation, "der (gleichen) Meinung sein," "to be of (the same) opinion," uses the genitive case and the verb "sein" ("to be"). See example 2.

Example Sentences:

  1. Ich habe keine Meinung dazu.
  2. Trump ist nicht der Meinung, dass das Militär im voraus sagen sollte, was es plant.
  3. Meiner Meinung nach gibt es zu viele Regeln in Fußball.
  4. Phillip Lahm ist meiner Meinung nach der beste deutsche Fußballspieler.
  5. Meine Freunde sind der gleichen Meinung.
  6. Wollen Sie uns Ihre Meinung sagen?
  7. Unter der kommunistischen Partei durfte man die Meinung nicht immer äußern.
  8. Wenn man ein akademisches Buch schreibt, muss man die eigenen Meinungen begründen.
  9. Was ist Ihrer Meinung nach denn der wichtigste Ratschlag für Deutschlernende?
  1. I have no opinion about that.
  2. Trump is not of the opinion that the military in advance should say what it's planning.
  3. In my opinion, there are too many rules in soccer.
  4. Phillip Lahm is, in my opinion, the best German soccer player.
  5. My friends are of the same opinion.
  6. Do you want to tell us your opinion?
  7. Under the communist party, one was not always allowed to express one's opinion.
  8. When one an academic book writes, one must one's own opinions support.
  9. What is in your opinion then the most important piece of advice for German learners?

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. COGNIZER hat eine Meinung.
  2. [COGNIZERs Meinung]
  3. [COGNIZERs Meinung zu TOPIC]
  4. COGNIZER ist der Meinung, dass OPINION.
  5. COGNIZER sagt COGNIZERs Meinung.
  6. COGNIZER äußert COGNIZERs Meinung.
  7. COGNIZER begründet COGNIZERs Meinung.
  1. COGNIZER has an opinion.
  2. [COGNIZER's opinion]
  3. [COGNIZERs opinion of/about TOPIC]
  4. COGNIZER is of the opinion, that OPINION.
  5. COGNIZER states COGNIZER's opinion.
  6. COGNIZER expresses COGNIZER's opinion.
  7. COGNIZER supports COGNIZER's opinion.

Details:

opinion

In most instances, this noun can be used like English "opinion," with the exception of the set phrase "meiner Meinung nach" ("in my opinion").  The possessive pronoun (in dative) in this phrase can be modified to reflect anyone's opinion, but the "nach" must always appear after "Meinung." The whole phrase fills the first position in the sentence (if it comes first), so a conjugated verb often follows it. See examples 

Another common collocation, "der (gleichen) Meinung sein," "to be of (the same) opinion," uses the genitive case and the verb "sein" ("to be"). See example 2.

Alternate Forms:

die Meinungen (pl.)
finden verb to find

Details:

to find (something to be a certain way), to think

While English does have this sense of "to find," as in "I find reading very relaxing" ("Ich finde Lesen sehr entspannend"), it is not used nearly as frequently as German "finden." This verb is generally used to ask what others think about something, i.e. to ask about their opinion. The Opinion is usually expressed as either a direct object and adjective combination (as in the previous example) or as a dependent clause headed by "dass" ("that"). 

Example Sentences:

  1. Wie findet ihr den Film?
  2. Ich finde, dass der Film zu langweilig ist.
  3. Wir finden, der Film ist leicht zu verstehen.
  4. Die Studenten haben den Film sehr interessant gefunden.
  5. Der Kritiker fand es nicht der Mühe wert, das neue Buch zu lesen.
  6. Der Arzt fand das Mädchen gesund, aber die Mutter glaubte es nicht.
  7. Sonja findet ihn unerträglich.
  8. Ich finde auch, dass man die Menschen nicht mit Politik verschonen muss.
  9. Manche Kurienmitarbeiter finden es unbarmherzig, dass der Papst sie vor Weihnachten schurigelte.
  1. How do you all find the movie? [What do you all think of the movie?]
  2. I find that the movie is too boring.
  3. We find, the movie is easy to understand.
  4. The students found the movie very interesting.
  5. The critic found it not worth the trouble to read the new book.
  6. The doctor found the girl healthy, but the mother didn't believe it.
  7. Sonja finds him unbearable.
  8. I also find that one must not avoid bothering people with politics.
  9. Some members of the Curia find it ruthless, that the pope bullied them before Christmas.

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. COGNIZER findet OPINION.
  2. COGNIZER findet, OPINION.
  3. COGNIZER findet, dass OPINION.
  1. COGNIZER finds OPINION.
  2. COGNIZER finds, OPINION.
  3. COGNIZER finds that OPINION.

Details:

to find (something to be a certain way), to think

While English does have this sense of "to find," as in "I find reading very relaxing" ("Ich finde Lesen sehr entspannend"), it is not used nearly as frequently as German "finden." This verb is generally used to ask what others think about something, i.e. to ask about their opinion. The Opinion is usually expressed as either a direct object and adjective combination (as in the previous example) or as a dependent clause headed by "dass" ("that"). 

Alternate Forms:

(er) findet, hat gefunden, fand
glauben verb to believe

Details:

to believe

It is sometimes difficult to distinguish the Opinion sense of "glauben" from its Awareness or Certainty senses, and in some instances, ambiguity is possible. The key difference is that in the Opinion sense, the Opinion frame element is not something that the Cognizer became aware of through their senses, it is not something that the Cognizer holds as part of their mental model of the world, and it is not something that the Cognizer is construing as fact or as an explanation for some event. See the entries for "glauben" in Thinking: Awareness and Thinking: Certainty for further explanation of these differences.

The most telling clue that a sentence with "glauben" involves Opinion rather than Awareness or Certainty is the presence of words like "gut" ("good"), "schön ("pretty") or "schlecht" ("bad"), that involve subjective interpretations. The following examples compare similar uses of "glauben" in the three Thinking frames it can evoke.

Thinking: Awareness

Ich glaube, wir haben eine Lösung gefunden.
I     believe, we have   a   solution found.
I believe we found a solution.

Thinking: Opinion

Ich glaube, wir haben eine gute Lösung gefunden.
I    believe, we have   a   good solution found.
I believe we found a good solution. 

Thinking: Certainty

Ich glaube, das Feuer wurde angezündet, bevor die Lösung bekannt gemacht wurde. 
I    believe, the fire     was   ignighted,     before the solution known made was.
I believe the fire was started before the solution was announced.

Example Sentences:

  1. Die meisten glauben, Schach ist etwas für alte Leute.
  2. Ich glaube, wir haben eine gute Lösung gefunden.
  3. Trotzdem glaube ich, dass es ein guter Familienfilm ist.
  4. Ich glaube, du bist die schönste Frau der Welt.
  1. Most believe, chess is something for old people.
  2. I believe we have found a good solution.
  3. Even so I believe that it is a good family film.
  4. I believe you are the most beautiful woman in the world.

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. COGNIZER glaubt, OPINION.
  2. COGNIZER glaubt, dass OPINION.
  1. COGNIZER believes OPINION.
  2. COGNIZER believes that OPINION.

Details:

to believe

It is sometimes difficult to distinguish the Opinion sense of "glauben" from its Awareness or Certainty senses, and in some instances, ambiguity is possible. The key difference is that in the Opinion sense, the Opinion frame element is not something that the Cognizer became aware of through their senses, it is not something that the Cognizer holds as part of their mental model of the world, and it is not something that the Cognizer is construing as fact or as an explanation for some event. See the entries for "glauben" in Thinking: Awareness and Thinking: Certainty for further explanation of these differences.

The most telling clue that a sentence with "glauben" involves Opinion rather than Awareness or Certainty is the presence of words like "gut" ("good"), "schön ("pretty") or "schlecht" ("bad"), that involve subjective interpretations. The following examples compare similar uses of "glauben" in the three Thinking frames it can evoke.

Thinking: Awareness

Ich glaube, wir haben eine Lösung gefunden.
I     believe, we have   a   solution found.
I believe we found a solution.

Thinking: Opinion

Ich glaube, wir haben eine gute Lösung gefunden.
I    believe, we have   a   good solution found.
I believe we found a good solution. 

Thinking: Certainty

Ich glaube, das Feuer wurde angezündet, bevor die Lösung bekannt gemacht wurde. 
I    believe, the fire     was   ignighted,     before the solution known made was.
I believe the fire was started before the solution was announced.

Alternate Forms:

(er) glaubt, hat geglaubt, glaubte
meinen verb to believe, to opine, to think

Details:

to think, to belive, to opine, to be of the opinion

"Meinen" lacks a good translation in English because it is the verbal form of the word for "opinion" ("die Meinung"). English has "to opine," but its infrequency makes it a poor candidate, so "meinen" is typically translated as "to think" or "to believe." The key difference with "meinen" is that it definitely refers to having an opinion or being of a certain opinion. Its patterns of use are similar to "glauben" and "denken" in the Opinion frame.

Note that "meinen" also has the sense "to mean," as in "Was meinst du?" ("What do you mean?"), which belongs to a different frame.

Example Sentences:

  1. Die Studenten meinen, die Kosten des Studiums sind zu hoch.
  2. Der Unterschied zwischen Clinton oder Trump sei minimal, meinte der syrische Präsident.
  3. "Alles ist gesagt, was zu sagen ist", meint er.
  4. Zugleich meinen auch 85 Prozent, dass eine Demokratie ohne politische Opposition nicht denkbar wäre.
  1. The students think the costs of studying are too high.
  2. The difference between Clinton or Trump would be minimal, believes the syrian president.
  3. "Everything is said that there is to say", he opines.
  4. At the same time, also 85 percent believe that a democracy without political opposition would not be thinkable.

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. COGNIZER meint, OPINION.
  2. COGNIZER meint, dass OPINION.
  1. COGNIZER thinks, OPINION.
  2. COGNIZER thinks, dass OPINION.

Details:

to think, to belive, to opine, to be of the opinion

"Meinen" lacks a good translation in English because it is the verbal form of the word for "opinion" ("die Meinung"). English has "to opine," but its infrequency makes it a poor candidate, so "meinen" is typically translated as "to think" or "to believe." The key difference with "meinen" is that it definitely refers to having an opinion or being of a certain opinion. Its patterns of use are similar to "glauben" and "denken" in the Opinion frame.

Note that "meinen" also has the sense "to mean," as in "Was meinst du?" ("What do you mean?"), which belongs to a different frame.

Alternate Forms:

(er) meint, hat gemeint, meinte