Frame description

In this frame, an Agent engages in personal body care. An Instrument (e.g. a wash cloth) can be used in this process as well as a Medium (e.g. soap and water).

In this frame, an Agent engages in personal body care. An Instrument (e.g. a wash cloth) can be used in this process as well as a Medium (e.g. soap and water).

Frame Elements

The core frame elements of this frame are the Agent, the Patient, and the Body Part.

The Agent is the person who performs the grooming/washing.

The Patient is the one being groomed/washed. The Patient may be the same as the Agent or a different person.

Sometimes, a specific Body Part of the Patient is mentioned.

 

Display columns:

Details
Examples
Grammar Notes
Sentence Templates
Alternate Forms

Frame Elements

Frame Element descriptions (on hover):

The agent is the person who does the grooming.

Framey(AGENT) badet seinen Hund und sein Schwein(PATIENT).

This is the region of the body that gets groomed.

Zuletzt bürstet er(AGENT) sich(PATIENT) (und dem Hund, PATIENT) die Haare(BODYPART).

The patient is the person who gets washed.

Nachher muss er(AGENT) sich(PATIENT) duschen.

Details
Examples
Grammar Notes
Sentence Templates
Alternate Forms
See All Information
baden verb bathe

Details:

to bathe, to take a bath

*Note that German does not use the phrase "take a bath" ("ein Bad nehmen") as commonly as English. Instead, they often use the verb "baden," e.g. "Ich bade" ("I bathe").

With this verb, the Patient can be realized with a reflexive pronoun (in accusative), e.g. "Ich bade mich" ("I bathe myself"). Unlike some of the other verbs of Grooming, however, the dative reflexive pronoun is not typically used when the Body Part is mentioned.

Example Sentences:

  1. Anne badete und ging ins Bett.
  2. Die Mutter badet ihr Baby jeden Abend.
  3. Mein Bruder hat sich bei uns gebadet, als er uns besucht hat.
  4. Am Abend badet Sabine ihre Füße.
  1. Anne took a bath and went to bed.
  2. The mother bathes her baby every evening.
  3. My brother bathed himself at our place when he visited us.
  4. In the evening Sabine bathes her feet.

Grammar:

German vs. English

Frames: 

When it comes to Grooming, English differs from German in two respects. First, instead of using a simple verb like German duschen, English often uses a phrasal verb, where a meaningful noun (shower, bath) combines with a ‘light’ verb (take).

I take several showers a day. - Ich dusche mich mehrmals am Tag.

Second, while German expresses the Patient as though it is directly affected by the verb (as a direct or indirect object), English construes this participant more as a possessor of the body part (with a possessive pronoun).

I brush my teethIch putze mir die Zähne.

I brush his teeth.–Ich putze ihm die Zähne.

Proper German and Spoken German

Frames: 

While proper grammar requires the use of these reflexive pronouns for a number of verbs, Germans frequently omit them in colloquial language, and even go so far as to say it like English, ‘ich putze meine Zähne.

Ich dusche.
Ich putze die Zähne.
Ich putze meine Zähne.

Reflexive Verbs and Pronouns

Verbs that are used reflexively often carry a reciprocal meaning or the meaning that the subject is performing the action of the verb on themself, although some abstract verbs are used reflexively without such meanings. In any case, the reflexive pronouns and word order are the same. As a general rule, the reflexive pronoun should appear just after the subject, although the V2 rule trumps this one, so in a basic sentence, you will find: subject, verb, reflexive (e.g. Er verliebt sich in Melanie, "He is falling in love with Melanie"). For further examples, consult the Examples sections of reflexive verbs. Click here for further explanation.

NominativAkkusativDativ
ichmichmir
dudichdir
er/sie/essichsich
wirunsuns
ihreucheuch
sie/Siesichsich

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. AGENT badet.
  2. AGENT badet PATIENT.
  3. AGENT badet BODYPART.
  1. AGENT takes a bath.
  2. AGENT bathes PATIENT.
  3. AGENT bathes BODYPART.

Details:

to bathe, to take a bath

*Note that German does not use the phrase "take a bath" ("ein Bad nehmen") as commonly as English. Instead, they often use the verb "baden," e.g. "Ich bade" ("I bathe").

With this verb, the Patient can be realized with a reflexive pronoun (in accusative), e.g. "Ich bade mich" ("I bathe myself"). Unlike some of the other verbs of Grooming, however, the dative reflexive pronoun is not typically used when the Body Part is mentioned.

Alternate Forms:

er badet, hat gebadet, badete
bürsten (die Haare bürsten) verb brush (hair)

Details:

to brush (one's hair)

While English uses the same word for brushing your teeth and brushing your hair, this is not so with German. This verb is used with hair only (for cleaning teeth, German uses the verb "putzen").

Example Sentences:

  1. Sie bürstet die Haare.
  2. Er hat seine Haare nach hinten gebürstet.
  3. Bevor man ausgeht, bürstet man sich die Haare.
  1. She brushes her hair.
  2. He brushed his hair back.
  3. Before one goes out, one brushes one's hair.

Grammar:

The Grammar of Grooming

Frames: 

The verbs in the Grooming frame are interesting from a German-English perspective, because German commonly uses a reflexive pronoun to specify that the Agent is washing her/himself, and thus that the Agent and the Patient are the same entity.

When a Body Part is not mentioned, the reflexive pronoun is in the accusative.
   Ich dusche mich.–I shower (myself).

When it is mentioned, the reflexive pronoun is in the dative, and the Body Part is in the accusative.
   Ich putze mir die Zähne. -- I brush (myself) the teeth.

The grammar note entitled "Reflexive Pronouns" contains a chart with both dative and accusative forms; visit Grimm Grammar for more information (http://coerll.utexas.edu/gg/gr/vrf_01.html).
If the Patient is a different person than the Agent, then the dative and accusative cases are used as normal.
   Ich kämme dem Kind/ihm die Haare.

German vs. English

Frames: 

When it comes to Grooming, English differs from German in two respects. First, instead of using a simple verb like German duschen, English often uses a phrasal verb, where a meaningful noun (shower, bath) combines with a ‘light’ verb (take).

I take several showers a day. - Ich dusche mich mehrmals am Tag.

Second, while German expresses the Patient as though it is directly affected by the verb (as a direct or indirect object), English construes this participant more as a possessor of the body part (with a possessive pronoun).

I brush my teethIch putze mir die Zähne.

I brush his teeth.–Ich putze ihm die Zähne.

Reflexive Verbs and Pronouns

Verbs that are used reflexively often carry a reciprocal meaning or the meaning that the subject is performing the action of the verb on themself, although some abstract verbs are used reflexively without such meanings. In any case, the reflexive pronouns and word order are the same. As a general rule, the reflexive pronoun should appear just after the subject, although the V2 rule trumps this one, so in a basic sentence, you will find: subject, verb, reflexive (e.g. Er verliebt sich in Melanie, "He is falling in love with Melanie"). For further examples, consult the Examples sections of reflexive verbs. Click here for further explanation.

NominativAkkusativDativ
ichmichmir
dudichdir
er/sie/essichsich
wirunsuns
ihreucheuch
sie/Siesichsich

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. AGENT bürstet BODYPART.
  2. AGENT bürstet PATIENT BODYPART.
  1. AGENT brushes BODYPART.
  2. AGENT brushes PATIENT BODYPART.

Details:

to brush (one's hair)

While English uses the same word for brushing your teeth and brushing your hair, this is not so with German. This verb is used with hair only (for cleaning teeth, German uses the verb "putzen").

Alternate Forms:

er/sie bürstet, hat gebürstet. bürstete
die Seife noun soap, body wash

Details:

soap

"Seife" ("soap") is used more narrowly in German than in English, as it typically refers to soap used for Grooming (and is thus often equivalent to "body wash"). In this frame, it fills the role of the Medium used to clean a Body_part. This noun frequently appears with the verb "waschen." 

It is possible for "Seife" to evoke the Cleaning frame as a Medium to clean materials made of cloth, but this is much less common, so it is only included here.

Example Sentences:

  1. Ich wasche mir die Hände mit Seife.
  2. Er wusch sich das Gesicht mit Seife.
  3. Du musst dich mit heißem Wasser und Seife waschen.
  4. Habt ihr euch die Hände mit Seife gewaschen?
  5. Es reichen fließendes Wasser und eine normale Seife.
  1. I wash my hands with soap.
  2. He washed his face with soap.
  3. You have to wash yourself with hot water and soap.
  4. Have you all your hands with soap washed?
  5. It suffices (to use) running water and a normal soap.

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. AGENT wäscht sich BODYPART mit Seife.
  2. AGENT wäscht PATIENT mit Seife.
  1. AGENT washes BODYPART with soap.
  2. AGENT washes PATIENT with soap.

Details:

soap

"Seife" ("soap") is used more narrowly in German than in English, as it typically refers to soap used for Grooming (and is thus often equivalent to "body wash"). In this frame, it fills the role of the Medium used to clean a Body_part. This noun frequently appears with the verb "waschen." 

It is possible for "Seife" to evoke the Cleaning frame as a Medium to clean materials made of cloth, but this is much less common, so it is only included here.

Alternate Forms:

die Seifen
duschen verb shower

Details:

to shower, to take a shower

*Note that German does not commonly use the phrase "take a shower" ("eine Dusche nehmen"). Instead, they simply use the verb "duschen".

The Patient may be realized as an accusative object, as In (a), or it may be omitted, as in (b).

(a) Ich dusche mich.

(b) Ich  dusche.

Sometimes, the expression "duschen gehen" ("to go shower") is used.

Ich gehe (michduschen.

While it is not incorrect per se to use the Bodypart frame element with duschen (e.g. "Sie duscht ihre Füße," "She showers her feet"), this is not a particularly common usage, and so it is left out of the Sentence Templates (in such a case, one would likely use the less common verb "abduschen," "to give a shower," but this varies by speaker).

Example Sentences:

  1. Fritz duscht vor der Arbeit.
  2. Ich singe gern, während ich dusche.
  3. Marianne ging nach Hause, duschte sich, und wechselte die Kleidung.
  1. Fritz showers before work.
  2. I like to sing, while I take a shower.
  3. Marianne went home, showered herself, and changed her clothes.

Grammar:

The Grammar of Grooming

Frames: 

The verbs in the Grooming frame are interesting from a German-English perspective, because German commonly uses a reflexive pronoun to specify that the Agent is washing her/himself, and thus that the Agent and the Patient are the same entity.

When a Body Part is not mentioned, the reflexive pronoun is in the accusative.
   Ich dusche mich.–I shower (myself).

When it is mentioned, the reflexive pronoun is in the dative, and the Body Part is in the accusative.
   Ich putze mir die Zähne. -- I brush (myself) the teeth.

The grammar note entitled "Reflexive Pronouns" contains a chart with both dative and accusative forms; visit Grimm Grammar for more information (http://coerll.utexas.edu/gg/gr/vrf_01.html).
If the Patient is a different person than the Agent, then the dative and accusative cases are used as normal.
   Ich kämme dem Kind/ihm die Haare.

German vs. English

Frames: 

When it comes to Grooming, English differs from German in two respects. First, instead of using a simple verb like German duschen, English often uses a phrasal verb, where a meaningful noun (shower, bath) combines with a ‘light’ verb (take).

I take several showers a day. - Ich dusche mich mehrmals am Tag.

Second, while German expresses the Patient as though it is directly affected by the verb (as a direct or indirect object), English construes this participant more as a possessor of the body part (with a possessive pronoun).

I brush my teethIch putze mir die Zähne.

I brush his teeth.–Ich putze ihm die Zähne.

Proper German and Spoken German

Frames: 

While proper grammar requires the use of these reflexive pronouns for a number of verbs, Germans frequently omit them in colloquial language, and even go so far as to say it like English, ‘ich putze meine Zähne.

Ich dusche.
Ich putze die Zähne.
Ich putze meine Zähne.

Reflexive Verbs and Pronouns

Verbs that are used reflexively often carry a reciprocal meaning or the meaning that the subject is performing the action of the verb on themself, although some abstract verbs are used reflexively without such meanings. In any case, the reflexive pronouns and word order are the same. As a general rule, the reflexive pronoun should appear just after the subject, although the V2 rule trumps this one, so in a basic sentence, you will find: subject, verb, reflexive (e.g. Er verliebt sich in Melanie, "He is falling in love with Melanie"). For further examples, consult the Examples sections of reflexive verbs. Click here for further explanation.

NominativAkkusativDativ
ichmichmir
dudichdir
er/sie/essichsich
wirunsuns
ihreucheuch
sie/Siesichsich

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. AGENT duscht.
  2. AGENT duscht PATIENT.
  1. AGENT takes a shower.
  2. AGENT showers PATIENT.

Details:

to shower, to take a shower

*Note that German does not commonly use the phrase "take a shower" ("eine Dusche nehmen"). Instead, they simply use the verb "duschen".

The Patient may be realized as an accusative object, as In (a), or it may be omitted, as in (b).

(a) Ich dusche mich.

(b) Ich  dusche.

Sometimes, the expression "duschen gehen" ("to go shower") is used.

Ich gehe (michduschen.

While it is not incorrect per se to use the Bodypart frame element with duschen (e.g. "Sie duscht ihre Füße," "She showers her feet"), this is not a particularly common usage, and so it is left out of the Sentence Templates (in such a case, one would likely use the less common verb "abduschen," "to give a shower," but this varies by speaker).

Alternate Forms:

er duscht, hat geduscht, duschte
kämmen (die Haare kämmen) verb comb

Details:

to comb (one's hair)

This verb is used like English "comb" to describe hair grooming.

Example Sentences:

  1. Man sollte die Haare regelmäßig kämmen.
  2. Du kämmst dich oft.
  3. Die Haare hat sie nach hinten gekämmt.
  4. Ich kämme meine Haare am Morgen.
  5. Das Kind kämmt mir die Haare.
  6. Er rasiert sich, bevor er sich die Haare kämmt.
  1. One should comb one's hair regularly.
  2. You comb your hair often.
  3. She combed her hair back.
  4. I comb my hair in the morning.
  5. The child combs my hair.
  6. He shaves (himself), before he combs his hair.

Grammar:

The Grammar of Grooming

Frames: 

The verbs in the Grooming frame are interesting from a German-English perspective, because German commonly uses a reflexive pronoun to specify that the Agent is washing her/himself, and thus that the Agent and the Patient are the same entity.

When a Body Part is not mentioned, the reflexive pronoun is in the accusative.
   Ich dusche mich.–I shower (myself).

When it is mentioned, the reflexive pronoun is in the dative, and the Body Part is in the accusative.
   Ich putze mir die Zähne. -- I brush (myself) the teeth.

The grammar note entitled "Reflexive Pronouns" contains a chart with both dative and accusative forms; visit Grimm Grammar for more information (http://coerll.utexas.edu/gg/gr/vrf_01.html).
If the Patient is a different person than the Agent, then the dative and accusative cases are used as normal.
   Ich kämme dem Kind/ihm die Haare.

German vs. English

Frames: 

When it comes to Grooming, English differs from German in two respects. First, instead of using a simple verb like German duschen, English often uses a phrasal verb, where a meaningful noun (shower, bath) combines with a ‘light’ verb (take).

I take several showers a day. - Ich dusche mich mehrmals am Tag.

Second, while German expresses the Patient as though it is directly affected by the verb (as a direct or indirect object), English construes this participant more as a possessor of the body part (with a possessive pronoun).

I brush my teethIch putze mir die Zähne.

I brush his teeth.–Ich putze ihm die Zähne.

Reflexive Verbs and Pronouns

Verbs that are used reflexively often carry a reciprocal meaning or the meaning that the subject is performing the action of the verb on themself, although some abstract verbs are used reflexively without such meanings. In any case, the reflexive pronouns and word order are the same. As a general rule, the reflexive pronoun should appear just after the subject, although the V2 rule trumps this one, so in a basic sentence, you will find: subject, verb, reflexive (e.g. Er verliebt sich in Melanie, "He is falling in love with Melanie"). For further examples, consult the Examples sections of reflexive verbs. Click here for further explanation.

NominativAkkusativDativ
ichmichmir
dudichdir
er/sie/essichsich
wirunsuns
ihreucheuch
sie/Siesichsich

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. AGENT kämmt BODYPART.
  2. AGENT kämmt PATIENT.
  3. AGENT kämmt PATIENT BODYPART.
  1. AGENT combs BODYPART.
  2. AGENT combs PATIENT.
  3. AGENT combs PATIENT BODYPART.

Details:

to comb (one's hair)

This verb is used like English "comb" to describe hair grooming.

Alternate Forms:

er kämmt, hat gekämmt, kämmte
maniküren (sich maniküren lassen) verb manicure

Details:

manicure (get a manicure, have oneself manicured) In English, we use a support verb "get" with the noun "manicure" to say "to get a manicure." In German, they use an expression like "she lets herself be manicured." Sie lässt sich maniküren. Note that there is no Agent in this pattern, since another person is performing the manicure.

Example Sentences:

  1. Die Nail-Designerin manikürt sich jede Woche.
  2. Sie manikürte ihm die Hände.
  3. Lola ließ sich maniküren.
  4. Ich habe letzte Woche meine Nägel maniküren lassen.
  1. The nail designer manicures herself every week.
  2. She manicures his hands.
  3. Lola gets a manicure.
  4. I had my nails manicured last week.

Grammar:

The Grammar of Grooming

Frames: 

The verbs in the Grooming frame are interesting from a German-English perspective, because German commonly uses a reflexive pronoun to specify that the Agent is washing her/himself, and thus that the Agent and the Patient are the same entity.

When a Body Part is not mentioned, the reflexive pronoun is in the accusative.
   Ich dusche mich.–I shower (myself).

When it is mentioned, the reflexive pronoun is in the dative, and the Body Part is in the accusative.
   Ich putze mir die Zähne. -- I brush (myself) the teeth.

The grammar note entitled "Reflexive Pronouns" contains a chart with both dative and accusative forms; visit Grimm Grammar for more information (http://coerll.utexas.edu/gg/gr/vrf_01.html).
If the Patient is a different person than the Agent, then the dative and accusative cases are used as normal.
   Ich kämme dem Kind/ihm die Haare.

German vs. English

Frames: 

When it comes to Grooming, English differs from German in two respects. First, instead of using a simple verb like German duschen, English often uses a phrasal verb, where a meaningful noun (shower, bath) combines with a ‘light’ verb (take).

I take several showers a day. - Ich dusche mich mehrmals am Tag.

Second, while German expresses the Patient as though it is directly affected by the verb (as a direct or indirect object), English construes this participant more as a possessor of the body part (with a possessive pronoun).

I brush my teethIch putze mir die Zähne.

I brush his teeth.–Ich putze ihm die Zähne.

Reflexive Verbs and Pronouns

Verbs that are used reflexively often carry a reciprocal meaning or the meaning that the subject is performing the action of the verb on themself, although some abstract verbs are used reflexively without such meanings. In any case, the reflexive pronouns and word order are the same. As a general rule, the reflexive pronoun should appear just after the subject, although the V2 rule trumps this one, so in a basic sentence, you will find: subject, verb, reflexive (e.g. Er verliebt sich in Melanie, "He is falling in love with Melanie"). For further examples, consult the Examples sections of reflexive verbs. Click here for further explanation.

NominativAkkusativDativ
ichmichmir
dudichdir
er/sie/essichsich
wirunsuns
ihreucheuch
sie/Siesichsich

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. AGENT manikürt PATIENT.
  2. AGENT manikürt PATIENT BODYPART.
  3. PATIENT lässt PATIENT maniküren.
  4. PATIENT lässt PATIENT BODYPART maniküren.
  1. AGENT manicures PATIENT.
  2. AGENT manicures PATIENT BODYPART.
  3. PATIENT gets a manicure. (PATIENT lets PATIENT be manicured)
  4. PATIENT gets BODYPART manicured. (PATIENT lets BODYPART be manicured)

Details:

manicure (get a manicure, have oneself manicured) In English, we use a support verb "get" with the noun "manicure" to say "to get a manicure." In German, they use an expression like "she lets herself be manicured." Sie lässt sich maniküren. Note that there is no Agent in this pattern, since another person is performing the manicure.

Alternate Forms:

er/sie manikürt, manikürte, hat manikürt (er/sie läßt, ließ, hat gelassen (perf.)_
putzen (die Zähne putzen) verb brush (teeth)

Details:

brush (one's teeth), lit. 'to clean'

While English uses the same word for brushing your teeth and brushing your hair, this is not so with German. This verb is used with teeth only (for hair, German uses the verb "kämmen" or "bürsten").

Example Sentences:

  1. Lara putzt sich die Zähne im Badezimmer.
  2. Maya hat einen zweijährigen Sohn, und sie putzt ihm die Zähne jeden Abend.
  3. Ich habe meine Zähne noch nicht geputzt.
  4. Die Jungen lernen, die Zähne richtig zu putzen.
  1. Lara is brushing her teeth in the bathroom.
  2. Maya has a two year old son, and she brushes his teeth every evening.
  3. I have not yet brushed my teeth.
  4. The boys learn to brush their teeth correctly.

Grammar:

The Grammar of Grooming

Frames: 

The verbs in the Grooming frame are interesting from a German-English perspective, because German commonly uses a reflexive pronoun to specify that the Agent is washing her/himself, and thus that the Agent and the Patient are the same entity.

When a Body Part is not mentioned, the reflexive pronoun is in the accusative.
   Ich dusche mich.–I shower (myself).

When it is mentioned, the reflexive pronoun is in the dative, and the Body Part is in the accusative.
   Ich putze mir die Zähne. -- I brush (myself) the teeth.

The grammar note entitled "Reflexive Pronouns" contains a chart with both dative and accusative forms; visit Grimm Grammar for more information (http://coerll.utexas.edu/gg/gr/vrf_01.html).
If the Patient is a different person than the Agent, then the dative and accusative cases are used as normal.
   Ich kämme dem Kind/ihm die Haare.

German vs. English

Frames: 

When it comes to Grooming, English differs from German in two respects. First, instead of using a simple verb like German duschen, English often uses a phrasal verb, where a meaningful noun (shower, bath) combines with a ‘light’ verb (take).

I take several showers a day. - Ich dusche mich mehrmals am Tag.

Second, while German expresses the Patient as though it is directly affected by the verb (as a direct or indirect object), English construes this participant more as a possessor of the body part (with a possessive pronoun).

I brush my teethIch putze mir die Zähne.

I brush his teeth.–Ich putze ihm die Zähne.

Proper German and Spoken German

Frames: 

While proper grammar requires the use of these reflexive pronouns for a number of verbs, Germans frequently omit them in colloquial language, and even go so far as to say it like English, ‘ich putze meine Zähne.

Ich dusche.
Ich putze die Zähne.
Ich putze meine Zähne.

Reflexive Verbs and Pronouns

Verbs that are used reflexively often carry a reciprocal meaning or the meaning that the subject is performing the action of the verb on themself, although some abstract verbs are used reflexively without such meanings. In any case, the reflexive pronouns and word order are the same. As a general rule, the reflexive pronoun should appear just after the subject, although the V2 rule trumps this one, so in a basic sentence, you will find: subject, verb, reflexive (e.g. Er verliebt sich in Melanie, "He is falling in love with Melanie"). For further examples, consult the Examples sections of reflexive verbs. Click here for further explanation.

NominativAkkusativDativ
ichmichmir
dudichdir
er/sie/essichsich
wirunsuns
ihreucheuch
sie/Siesichsich

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. AGENT putzt BODYPART.
  2. AGENT putzt PATIENT BODYPART.
  1. AGENT brushes BODYPART.
  2. AGENT brushes PATIENT BODYPART.

Details:

brush (one's teeth), lit. 'to clean'

While English uses the same word for brushing your teeth and brushing your hair, this is not so with German. This verb is used with teeth only (for hair, German uses the verb "kämmen" or "bürsten").

Alternate Forms:

er putzt, hat geputzt, putzte
rasieren verb shave

Details:

to shave

If a specific Body Part is mentioned, then the Patient (possessor of the hair) is realized as either a dative object, as in (a), or in a possessive pronoun preceding the body part, as in (b).

(a) Ich rasiere mir die Beine. - I shave myself the legs.

(b) Ich rasiere meine Beine. - I shave my legs.

If no Body Part is mentioned, the Patient may be realized as an accusative object, as in (c), or omitted completely, as in (d).

(c) Ich rasiere mich (jeden Tag). - I shave myself (every day).

(d) Ich rasiere (jeden Tag). - I shave (every day).

Example Sentences:

  1. Noah rasiert jeden Morgen.
  2. Ich habe mich noch nie rasiert.
  3. Lara rasierte ihn.
  4. Mia rasiert sich die Achseln.
  5. Die Studentinnen haben alle ihre Beine rasiert.
  1. Noah shaves every morning.
  2. I have never shaved (myself).
  3. Lara shaved him.
  4. Mia shaves her armpits.
  5. The (female) students have all shaved their legs.

Grammar:

The Grammar of Grooming

Frames: 

The verbs in the Grooming frame are interesting from a German-English perspective, because German commonly uses a reflexive pronoun to specify that the Agent is washing her/himself, and thus that the Agent and the Patient are the same entity.

When a Body Part is not mentioned, the reflexive pronoun is in the accusative.
   Ich dusche mich.–I shower (myself).

When it is mentioned, the reflexive pronoun is in the dative, and the Body Part is in the accusative.
   Ich putze mir die Zähne. -- I brush (myself) the teeth.

The grammar note entitled "Reflexive Pronouns" contains a chart with both dative and accusative forms; visit Grimm Grammar for more information (http://coerll.utexas.edu/gg/gr/vrf_01.html).
If the Patient is a different person than the Agent, then the dative and accusative cases are used as normal.
   Ich kämme dem Kind/ihm die Haare.

German vs. English

Frames: 

When it comes to Grooming, English differs from German in two respects. First, instead of using a simple verb like German duschen, English often uses a phrasal verb, where a meaningful noun (shower, bath) combines with a ‘light’ verb (take).

I take several showers a day. - Ich dusche mich mehrmals am Tag.

Second, while German expresses the Patient as though it is directly affected by the verb (as a direct or indirect object), English construes this participant more as a possessor of the body part (with a possessive pronoun).

I brush my teethIch putze mir die Zähne.

I brush his teeth.–Ich putze ihm die Zähne.

Proper German and Spoken German

Frames: 

While proper grammar requires the use of these reflexive pronouns for a number of verbs, Germans frequently omit them in colloquial language, and even go so far as to say it like English, ‘ich putze meine Zähne.

Ich dusche.
Ich putze die Zähne.
Ich putze meine Zähne.

Reflexive Verbs and Pronouns

Verbs that are used reflexively often carry a reciprocal meaning or the meaning that the subject is performing the action of the verb on themself, although some abstract verbs are used reflexively without such meanings. In any case, the reflexive pronouns and word order are the same. As a general rule, the reflexive pronoun should appear just after the subject, although the V2 rule trumps this one, so in a basic sentence, you will find: subject, verb, reflexive (e.g. Er verliebt sich in Melanie, "He is falling in love with Melanie"). For further examples, consult the Examples sections of reflexive verbs. Click here for further explanation.

NominativAkkusativDativ
ichmichmir
dudichdir
er/sie/essichsich
wirunsuns
ihreucheuch
sie/Siesichsich

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. AGENT rasiert.
  2. AGENT rasiert PATIENT.
  3. AGENT rasiert PATIENT BODYPART.
  1. AGENT shaves.
  2. AGENT shaves PATIENT.
  3. AGENT shaves PATIENT BODYPART.

Details:

to shave

If a specific Body Part is mentioned, then the Patient (possessor of the hair) is realized as either a dative object, as in (a), or in a possessive pronoun preceding the body part, as in (b).

(a) Ich rasiere mir die Beine. - I shave myself the legs.

(b) Ich rasiere meine Beine. - I shave my legs.

If no Body Part is mentioned, the Patient may be realized as an accusative object, as in (c), or omitted completely, as in (d).

(c) Ich rasiere mich (jeden Tag). - I shave myself (every day).

(d) Ich rasiere (jeden Tag). - I shave (every day).

Alternate Forms:

er rasiert, hat rasiert, rasierte
waschen verb wash

Details:

to wash

In the Grooming frame, "waschen" ("to wash") refers specifically to the washing of a Body_part, which is expressed as the direct object (in accusative), usually along with a reflexive to show whose Body_part it is (see example 1 and the grammar note, "The Grammar of Grooming"). 

Example Sentences:

  1. Ich wasche mir die Hände bevor ich esse.
  2. Die Kinder haben sich die Hände gewaschen.
  3. Sara wäscht sich nicht jeden Tag die Haare.
  4. Die Mutter wäscht ihre Tochters Haare.
  1. I wash my hands before I eat.
  2. The kids have washed their hands.
  3. Sara does not wash every day her hair.
  4. The mother washes her daughter's hair.

Grammar:

The Grammar of Grooming

Frames: 

The verbs in the Grooming frame are interesting from a German-English perspective, because German commonly uses a reflexive pronoun to specify that the Agent is washing her/himself, and thus that the Agent and the Patient are the same entity.

When a Body Part is not mentioned, the reflexive pronoun is in the accusative.
   Ich dusche mich.–I shower (myself).

When it is mentioned, the reflexive pronoun is in the dative, and the Body Part is in the accusative.
   Ich putze mir die Zähne. -- I brush (myself) the teeth.

The grammar note entitled "Reflexive Pronouns" contains a chart with both dative and accusative forms; visit Grimm Grammar for more information (http://coerll.utexas.edu/gg/gr/vrf_01.html).
If the Patient is a different person than the Agent, then the dative and accusative cases are used as normal.
   Ich kämme dem Kind/ihm die Haare.

German vs. English

Frames: 

When it comes to Grooming, English differs from German in two respects. First, instead of using a simple verb like German duschen, English often uses a phrasal verb, where a meaningful noun (shower, bath) combines with a ‘light’ verb (take).

I take several showers a day. - Ich dusche mich mehrmals am Tag.

Second, while German expresses the Patient as though it is directly affected by the verb (as a direct or indirect object), English construes this participant more as a possessor of the body part (with a possessive pronoun).

I brush my teethIch putze mir die Zähne.

I brush his teeth.–Ich putze ihm die Zähne.

Proper German and Spoken German

Frames: 

While proper grammar requires the use of these reflexive pronouns for a number of verbs, Germans frequently omit them in colloquial language, and even go so far as to say it like English, ‘ich putze meine Zähne.

Ich dusche.
Ich putze die Zähne.
Ich putze meine Zähne.

Reflexive Verbs and Pronouns

Verbs that are used reflexively often carry a reciprocal meaning or the meaning that the subject is performing the action of the verb on themself, although some abstract verbs are used reflexively without such meanings. In any case, the reflexive pronouns and word order are the same. As a general rule, the reflexive pronoun should appear just after the subject, although the V2 rule trumps this one, so in a basic sentence, you will find: subject, verb, reflexive (e.g. Er verliebt sich in Melanie, "He is falling in love with Melanie"). For further examples, consult the Examples sections of reflexive verbs. Click here for further explanation.

NominativAkkusativDativ
ichmichmir
dudichdir
er/sie/essichsich
wirunsuns
ihreucheuch
sie/Siesichsich

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. AGENT wascht sich BODYPART.
  2. AGENT wascht PATIENT.
  1. AGENT washes their BODYPART.
  2. AGENT washes PATIENT.

Details:

to wash

In the Grooming frame, "waschen" ("to wash") refers specifically to the washing of a Body_part, which is expressed as the direct object (in accusative), usually along with a reflexive to show whose Body_part it is (see example 1 and the grammar note, "The Grammar of Grooming"). 

Alternate Forms:

(er) wäscht, hat gewaschen, wusch
Zahnseide benutzen verb floss

Details:

floss (one's teeth), lit. 'to use dental floss'

Because there is no German verb quite like English "floss," this combination of noun and verb is used instead. 

Example Sentences:

  1. Benutzt du Zahnseide?
  2. Lukas benutzt Zahnseide, nachdem er isst.
  3. Der Zahnarzt hat vorgeschlagen, Zahnseide zu benutzen.
  1. Do you floss?
  2. Lukas flosses after he eats.
  3. The dentist suggested using floss.

Grammar:

Der, die, das

Remember that all nouns have a specific gender; they are either masculine, feminine or neuter. It is very important to know the gender of every single noun to master the rather complex case system in German.
In German, as in English, you can either have a direct (der, die das - the) or indirect (ein, eine, ein -a) article preceding a noun. The tables below will help you review how articles change based on gender and cases.

 

 MasculineFeminineNeuterPlural (all genders)
Nominativederdiedasdie
Accusativedendiedasdie
Dativedemderdemden
Genitivedesderdesder

 

 MaculineFeminineNeuterPlural (all genders)
Nominativeeineineein  --
Accusativeeineneineeine  --
Dativeeinemeinereinem  --
Genitiveeineseinereines  --

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. AGENT benutzt Zahnseide.
  1. AGENT uses dental floss. (AGENT flosses)

Details:

floss (one's teeth), lit. 'to use dental floss'

Because there is no German verb quite like English "floss," this combination of noun and verb is used instead. 

Alternate Forms:

die Zahnseide (dental floss); er benutzt, hat benutzt, benutzte
zupfen verb pluck

Details:

to pluck (e.g. eyebrows),  lit. 'to pull/tug' 

The possessor of the body part that is being plucked (i.e. the Patient) can be realized as a dative object, as in (a), or as a possessive pronoun preceding the Body Part, as in (b).

(a) Ich zupfe mir die Augenbrauen. - I pluck myself the eyebrows.

(b) Ich zupfe meine Augenbrauen. - I pluck my eyebrows.

Example Sentences:

  1. Ich wollte die Augenbrauen richtig zupfen.
  2. Anna zupft ihre Augenbrauen oft.
  3. Eine Freundin von mir hat mir die Augenbrauen gezupft, und ich sehe jetzt toll aus!
  1. I wanted to pluck my eyebrows right.
  2. Anna plucks her eyebrows often.
  3. A friend of mine plucked my eyebrows, and now I look great!

Grammar:

The Grammar of Grooming

Frames: 

The verbs in the Grooming frame are interesting from a German-English perspective, because German commonly uses a reflexive pronoun to specify that the Agent is washing her/himself, and thus that the Agent and the Patient are the same entity.

When a Body Part is not mentioned, the reflexive pronoun is in the accusative.
   Ich dusche mich.–I shower (myself).

When it is mentioned, the reflexive pronoun is in the dative, and the Body Part is in the accusative.
   Ich putze mir die Zähne. -- I brush (myself) the teeth.

The grammar note entitled "Reflexive Pronouns" contains a chart with both dative and accusative forms; visit Grimm Grammar for more information (http://coerll.utexas.edu/gg/gr/vrf_01.html).
If the Patient is a different person than the Agent, then the dative and accusative cases are used as normal.
   Ich kämme dem Kind/ihm die Haare.

Reflexive Verbs and Pronouns

Verbs that are used reflexively often carry a reciprocal meaning or the meaning that the subject is performing the action of the verb on themself, although some abstract verbs are used reflexively without such meanings. In any case, the reflexive pronouns and word order are the same. As a general rule, the reflexive pronoun should appear just after the subject, although the V2 rule trumps this one, so in a basic sentence, you will find: subject, verb, reflexive (e.g. Er verliebt sich in Melanie, "He is falling in love with Melanie"). For further examples, consult the Examples sections of reflexive verbs. Click here for further explanation.

NominativAkkusativDativ
ichmichmir
dudichdir
er/sie/essichsich
wirunsuns
ihreucheuch
sie/Siesichsich

Templates with Frame Elements:

  1. AGENT zupft BODYPART.
  2. AGENT zupft PATIENT BODYPART.
  1. AGENT plucks BODYPART.
  2. AGENT plucks PATIENT BODYPART.

Details:

to pluck (e.g. eyebrows),  lit. 'to pull/tug' 

The possessor of the body part that is being plucked (i.e. the Patient) can be realized as a dative object, as in (a), or as a possessive pronoun preceding the Body Part, as in (b).

(a) Ich zupfe mir die Augenbrauen. - I pluck myself the eyebrows.

(b) Ich zupfe meine Augenbrauen. - I pluck my eyebrows.

Alternate Forms:

er zupft, hat gezupft, zupfte